Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Omelette with Greens and Pommerac



This morning I made this super simple breakfast. It may not seem like much but for me it is quite the deal since breakfast is a meal I usually skip. Now that I am on a spiritual rejuvenation of sorts, i.e. vacation, I find myself wanting to rejuvenate my physical self as well. As such, I am making it my goal to improve on how I start my days. 



Luckily this is not going to be too hard to do since a couple of the fruit trees in my yard are bearing heavily. Right now our pommerac tree is making a spectacular showing. Without a doubt this fruit is set to be a regular feature at my table over the next month. 



Red Pepper Omelette
(serves 4)

8 eggs 
1/8 cup onions (chopped)
1/8 cup red bell peppers
1/8 cup Parmesan cheese ( or any cheese of your choice, grated)
salt to taste
1 tsp oil

watercress
pommerac (sliced)
choi sum flowers

METHOD:

Crack the eggs into a small bow. Whisk with a fork. Add chopped onion and red bell pepper. Season with salt and whisk a bit more.

Heat oil on medium heat in a frying pan. Once the oil is hot pour in the egg mixture, tilting the pan to spread the egg mixture in a circle to cover the base of the pan. 

As the omelette sets use a heatproof plastic spatula to gently lift the edges. At this point depending the type of frying pan you are using you may have to lower your heat. I have a ceramic coated frying pan that cooks best on low heat. Raise or lower heat according to the kind of pan you are cooking with. Occasionally you can tilt the pan so that the liquid runs off the top and cooks. Cook until the base is set and light golden and the top is almost set. The top should remain slightly liquid. Once folded over the residual heat will finish cooking it.

Sprinkle your cheese over the top and using your heatproof spatula fold the omelette in half. cook for a couple seconds more then transfer to a large plate and cut into four pieces. Serve with watercress, pommerac and choi sum flowers.






18 comments:

  1. You have peaked my interest. Where can I get some Choy Sum flowers? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Felix, HiLo on occasion sells choi sum.

      Delete
  2. a wonderful omelette rendition. I love the addition of the pommerac!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I see a lot of Spring colours in your omelette! It looks very pretty with pommerac and choy sum flowers.

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a gorgeous breakfast! And parmesan just makes everything special. Loving the pretty colours!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Beautiful dish. I never heard of pomerac. What does it taste like?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very hard to describe....it has a mild rose scent and is somewhat sweet, slightly tart with a high water content.

      Delete
  6. What a wonderful breakfast, everything you need on your plate, flowers, fruit and an omelette.

    ReplyDelete
  7. riquísimo y saludable su omelette,saludos.

    ReplyDelete
  8. that's a pretty lovely display! i've never heard of pomerac either, but your description above makes it sound terrific!

    ReplyDelete
  9. This looks so yummy!!! I love pommerac, there aren't alot of pommerac trees here in Antigua, cant wait to come back to Trinidad so I can have some!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Gorgeous! Definitely my kind of plate of food. And reading this I glanced at the clock because I forgot whether I'd eaten breakfast or not today. I try not to skip -- for me it's the most important meal of the day. And I would definitely enjoy this salad for breakfast. I've never heard of pomerac either...

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love the cooked red pepper taste and it's wonderful combination in omelettes! This looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Breakfast is my favorite meal of the day. I would love to have on of these omelettes to start my day.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Oh yes, that's the name - pommerac! We find it too in Nigeria, though I haven't been home much this season so have missed it. I love its cool, crisp texture! And fragrance. Love the salad too - it pays to start our days mindfully, doesn't it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What do you call this fruit in Nigeria?

      Delete